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Michigan Farm Bureau


The Michigan Farm Bureau team continues working on your behalf to advocate for your needs and connect you with resources to protect your farm business and employees during this challenging time.

As agriculture serves our state and nation as essential infrastructure, we recognize the need for personal protective equipment (PPE) is increasing and it will continue to as we begin to reopen the economy. PPE includes respirators, face masks, hand sanitizer, gloves, gowns, disinfectants, thermometers, face shields, barriers, wipes, goggles/glasses, etc.

To help connect you with PPE supplies for you and your employees, our team partnered with Great Lakes Ag Labor Services to compile a list of vendors willing to fulfill agriculture-based orders.

You can also access the complete MFB Coronavirus Resource web page here.

It’s important to note that inventory continues to fluctuate and is not guaranteed. Pricing of products, volume availability, order lead times, minimum order requirements, and shipping arrangements are all at the vendor’s discretion.  

Upon receiving your PPE and distributing to your farm and business employees, we encourage you to read the following Michigan Farm News story to ensure the PPE is being utilized correctly. COVID-19 PPE tutorial: When to use respirators, facemasks, or cloth face coverings in agriculture

Following are some best practices we recommend for sourcing Personal Protective Equipment:

  1. Check with your current supplier first. Most PPE is on allocation to other customers as the needs for healthcare are met. Websites may display product as unavailable or without a price, so contact suppliers by phone to speak directly with a salesperson. 
  2. Explain that you are part of the food and agriculture sector. Agriculture is an essential industry sector: ranked number two in priority behind health care/first responders. 
  3. Make your contacts as soon as possible. There will be additional requests when the state opens fully on May 15. 
  4. Consider pooling orders with neighboring farms and agribusinesses. There may be minimum order requirements depending on the supplier and a larger order may result in better pricing and delivery options. 
  5. Make sure you are using a trusted supplier. Cybercriminals and scammers are leveraging the COVID-19 pandemic for financial benefit. The latest FBI alert warns hackers are targeting industries that are attempting to buy PPE with business email compromise mail.  
  6. Take into consideration time frame and location. A supplier may not be able to meet entire order quantity immediately but will allocate supplies as they become available. Also make sure you’re talking to a supplier that will deliver near, or directly to, your location. 

If you have additional questions about PPE procurement, simply email us  and we’ll direct your inquiry to the appropriate team member.  

Thank you for your commitment to agriculture and Michigan Farm Bureau. We appreciate your membership and hope you and your family stay safe and healthy.  

To help connect you with PPE supplies for you and your employees, our team partnered with Great Lakes Ag Labor Services to compile a list of vendors willing to fulfill agriculture-based orders.

Allegan County Farm Bureau News

By Kate Thiel


Are you an artist at heart? Back by popular demand, the Agricultural Art Gallery provides an opportunity for Farm Bureau members to showcase their artistic abilities while celebrating agriculture. Members from across the state are encouraged to enter items in six categories:

  • Woodworking
  • Metal work
  • Drawing & painting
  • Fabric & fiber
  • Photography
  • 3D art (ceramics, pottery, sculpture)

Entrants’ peers will celebrate their work during MFB’s 2020 Annual Meeting, Dec. 1-3 in Grand Rapids. Popular vote during the event will determine a best in show and category winners.

All entries are considered contributions to the Michigan Foundation for Agriculture, unless otherwise noted. As such, funds generated will support leadership and educational programming throughout the state.

Popular vote winners will be auctioned live Wednesday evening. All other entries will be available via silent auction.

Prospective entrants are asked to register their entries before Nov. 20 by using this online registration form.

Kate Thiel is the Development Manager for the Michigan Foundation for Agriculture.


The Agricultural Art Gallery provides an opportunity for Farm Bureau members to showcase their artistic abilities while celebrating agriculture.

Michigan Farm Bureau


The Michigan Farm Bureau team continues working on your behalf to advocate for your needs and connect you with resources to protect your farm business and employees during this challenging time.

As agriculture serves our state and nation as essential infrastructure, we recognize the need for personal protective equipment (PPE) is increasing and it will continue to as we begin to reopen the economy. PPE includes respirators, face masks, hand sanitizer, gloves, gowns, disinfectants, thermometers, face shields, barriers, wipes, goggles/glasses, etc.

To help connect you with PPE supplies for you and your employees, our team partnered with Great Lakes Ag Labor Services to compile a list of vendors willing to fulfill agriculture-based orders.

You can also access the complete MFB Coronavirus Resource web page here.

It’s important to note that inventory continues to fluctuate and is not guaranteed. Pricing of products, volume availability, order lead times, minimum order requirements, and shipping arrangements are all at the vendor’s discretion.  

Upon receiving your PPE and distributing to your farm and business employees, we encourage you to read the following Michigan Farm News story to ensure the PPE is being utilized correctly. COVID-19 PPE tutorial: When to use respirators, facemasks, or cloth face coverings in agriculture

Following are some best practices we recommend for sourcing Personal Protective Equipment:

  1. Check with your current supplier first. Most PPE is on allocation to other customers as the needs for healthcare are met. Websites may display product as unavailable or without a price, so contact suppliers by phone to speak directly with a salesperson. 
  2. Explain that you are part of the food and agriculture sector. Agriculture is an essential industry sector: ranked number two in priority behind health care/first responders. 
  3. Make your contacts as soon as possible. There will be additional requests when the state opens fully on May 15. 
  4. Consider pooling orders with neighboring farms and agribusinesses. There may be minimum order requirements depending on the supplier and a larger order may result in better pricing and delivery options. 
  5. Make sure you are using a trusted supplier. Cybercriminals and scammers are leveraging the COVID-19 pandemic for financial benefit. The latest FBI alert warns hackers are targeting industries that are attempting to buy PPE with business email compromise mail.  
  6. Take into consideration time frame and location. A supplier may not be able to meet entire order quantity immediately but will allocate supplies as they become available. Also make sure you’re talking to a supplier that will deliver near, or directly to, your location. 

If you have additional questions about PPE procurement, simply email us  and we’ll direct your inquiry to the appropriate team member.  

Thank you for your commitment to agriculture and Michigan Farm Bureau. We appreciate your membership and hope you and your family stay safe and healthy.  

To help connect you with PPE supplies for you and your employees, our team partnered with Great Lakes Ag Labor Services to compile a list of vendors willing to fulfill agriculture-based orders.

State News


Rebecca Gulliver has been the Saginaw Valley Regional Manager for the past four and a half years. She has just recently transitioned into her new position based at the home office: Member Engagement and Field Training Specialist, which includes the Community Action Group program.

CLICK… CLACK… CLICK… CLACK…

Twenty-one steps are taken before turning sharply with the click of the heel to face east for 21 seconds exactly, then turning to face north for 21 seconds, followed by 21 steps down a black mat before repeating the process for an hour until a uniformed relief commander appears to announce the ceremonial changing of the guard. For 24 hours a day, soldiers from the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment stand watch over the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

Looking back to my first trip to Washington, D.C., between my junior and senior years of high school, I remember the impact watching that ceremony had on me. The entire D.C. experience humbled me, helped me appreciate the opportunities I enjoy, and quite honestly fired me up, thinking of how entitled our society has become in the midst of so much selflessness showcased through the time-honored memorials in D.C.

If you are not familiar, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is a white marble monument overlooking the nation’s capital from Arlington National Cemetery. Since 1921, it has been the final resting place for our nation’s unidentified servicemen and women — a place of mourning and reflection on the meaning and the cost of military service. Depending on the time of the year, the changing of the guard happens either every hour or every half hour, but it all comes down to tradition and paying respect to those who served our country.

Community Action Groups are a special tradition within our Farm Bureau Family. Personally, after I came on staff almost five years ago, attending my first CAG meeting was when it all came together — I felt like I finally understood what Farm Bureau was all about. I cherish that memory and look forward to being able to work in this capacity and with our organization’s time-honored tradition.

For those of you I haven’t yet had the honor of meeting, I am Rebecca Gulliver. For the past four and a half years I’ve been the Saginaw Valley Regional Manager, and just recently transitioned into my new position based at the home office: Member Engagement and Field Training Specialist, which includes this program.

Before Farm Bureau, I worked as the agriscience academic assistant at North Huron Schools, helping high school, junior high and elementary agriscience students with FFA. I graduated from Michigan State University in 2015 with a degree in agriscience, food and natural resources education and recently graduated from Northwood University with a master’s in organizational leadership. In my free time, I enjoy painting, crocheting, being the best aunt I can be to four nieces and a nephew, and playing with my dogs Harper and Hudson.

I look forward to getting to know each of your groups, and using the lessons I have learned through my experiences to give selflessly and serve our Community Action Groups to the best of my ability.

Community Action Groups are a special tradition within our Farm Bureau Family.

Attendees to MFB’s 2021 Annual Meeting can expect a smaller sea of delegates, as many are expected to take advantage of options to participate virtually — one of the silver linings of the pandemic-forced learning curve we’ve all been navigating since March of last year.
 

Michigan Farm Bureau’s 2021 Annual Meeting is taking shape as a hybrid affair, incorporating several familiar in-person activities and elements of last year’s virtual proceedings.

Pandemic precautions in 2020 made it necessary for an almost entirely virtual annual meeting, and feedback from members who took part was mixed. Most missed the camaraderie and efficiency of in-person interaction, but that sentiment was tempered by the undeniable convenience “phoning it in” meant for those living and farming long distances from Grand Rapids.

Barring the unforeseen, this year’s format will borrow from 2020 an early virtual kickoff event in early November for dispensing with reports and other formalities, followed by in-person district meetings the following week.

Those district meetings will allow delegates to nominate and elect their district director (odd-numbered districts only this year) and review the policy agenda prior to the full delegate body convening three weeks later.

The final component will largely resemble our familiar, in-person annuals, but in a condensed, two-day format that will incorporate means for delegates to join the proceedings without coming to Grand Rapids. Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 will be packed with Young Farmer discussion meets, the Ag Art Gallery, Promotion & Education content and more.

The agenda below isn’t final but is close enough to offer a good idea of what this year’s MFB Annual Meeting will look like. And it is not too early for interested members to let their county Farm Bureau leaders know they want to take part!

DRAFT AGENDA: MFB 2021 STATE ANNUAL MEETING 

Wednesday, Nov. 3

Virtual Kickoff: 7-8 p.m.

  • Welcome 
  • Business session call to order 
  • Approval of 2020 annual meeting minutes 
  • Officer reports 
  • Rules Committee report 
  • Credentials Committee report 

Tuesday, Nov. 9 & Wednesday, Nov. 10 

District Meetings: in person within the district; times TBD

  • Nominations & elections of district director (odd districts only) 
  • At-large director candidates to join virtually for introductions and Q&A 
  • Policy review

Tuesday, Nov.30

State Annual Meeting Day 1: in-person at Amway/DeVos, Grand Rapids

  • 9 – 11 a.m. • Young Farmer Discussion Meet registration, contestant & judges briefing 
  • 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. • Young Farmer Discussion Meet Sweet 16 – Round 1 
  • 12 – 1:30 p.m. • Discussion meet participant lunch 
  • 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. • Young Farmer Discussion Meet Sweet 16 – Round 2 
  • 2 – 9:30 p.m. • MFA Ag Art Gallery showcase & voting 
  • 2:30 – 5:30 p.m. • Opening delegate session (Hybrid delegation) 
    • Welcome 
    • Scheduled polices 
    • Young Farmer Discussion Meet Final Four announcement 
  • 5 – 5:30 p.m. • P&E Showcase sneak peak (for non-delegates) 
  • 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. • Reception 
    • P&E Showcase of County Activities of Excellence & 2-3 stations from state P&E committee 
    • Young Farmer Excellence Award presentation 
    • Sponsor exhibit space 
  • 6:30 – 9 p.m. • Leadership Banquet 
    • State Young Farmer committee Introductions 
    • Young Farmer Discussion Meet finals 
    • State P&E committee introductions 
    • Foundation introduction & kick-off for Art Gallery 
    • Recognition of county P&E activities and announcement for Ag Week 2022 
    • YF Awards – winners and finalist recognition 
    • Ag in the Classroom (Farm Science Lab & FARM Crates) and Educator of the Year 
    • Young Farmer Discussion Meet winner announcement 
    • Distribute P&E t-shirts

Wednesday, December 1 

State Annual Meeting Day 2: in-person at Amway/DeVos, Grand Rapids

  • 7:15 – 8:45 a.m. • Breakfast 
    • State AgriPac committee recognition 
    • AgriPac keynote speaker 
  • 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. • MFA Ag Art Gallery showcase & voting 
  • 8 – 8:30 a.m. • High School & Collegiate Discussion Meet registration & briefing
  • 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. • High School & Collegiate Discussion Meet round 1 
  • 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. • Delegate session (hybrid delegation) 
    • Nomination and elections of district, YF, P&E and at-large directors 
    • Scheduled polices 
    • Block voting 
  • 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. • High School & Collegiate Discussion Meet round 2 
  • 10:45 – 11 a.m. • High School & Collegiate Discussion Meet final six announcement 
  • 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. • High School & Collegiate Discussion Meet final six round 
  • 12:45 – 2:30 p.m. • Lunch 
    • Key Club recognition 
    • Agent Charitable Fund recognition 
    • High School & Collegiate Discussion Meet winners announced 
    • Presidential Volunteer of the Year 
  • 2:30 – 5:30 p.m. • Closing Delegate Session (hybrid delegation) 
    • Block voting 
    • High School & Collegiate Discussion Meet contestants observe 
  • 4 – 7 p.m. • Ag Art Gallery Silent Auction 
  • 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. • Friends of Agriculture Reception 
    • Incorporate elected Friends of Agriculture as a showcase event 
    • AgriPac pin sales 
  • Sponsor exhibit space 
  • 6:30 – 9 p.m. • Annual Banquet 
    • Distinguished Service to Agriculture Award 
    • President’s Address 
    • MFA Ag Art Gallery live auction (popular vote winners & best in show) 
Michigan Farm Bureau’s 2021 Annual Meeting is taking shape as a hybrid affair, incorporating several familiar in-person activities and elements of last year’s virtual proceedings.

Members looking to join the state board of directors are asked to express their candidacy in writing — email works — to MFB Secretary Andy Kok on or before the Annual Meeting Kickoff Nov. 3.
 

Ambitious Farm Bureau members looking to take their involvement game to the next level may consider contending for a seat on the MFB Board of Directors. This year’s state board election will decide who represents Farm Bureau members in Michigan’s odd-numbered districts, currently occupied by the following:

  • Dist. 1 — Brigettte Leach (Kalamazoo)
  • Dist. 3 — Mike Fusilier (Washtenaw)
  • Dist. 5 — Stephanie Schafer (Clinton)
  • Dist. 7 — Mike DeRuiter (Oceana)
  • Dist. 9 — Ben LaCross (Northwest Michigan)
  • Dist. 11 — Pat McGuire (Antrim)

Two at-large positions are also up for reelection:

  • At-Large — Andy Hagenow (Kent)
  • At-Large — Doug Darling (Monroe)

The third at-large position is occupied by President Carl Bednarski (Tuscola), who will be up for re-election next year.

Members looking to join the state board of directors are asked to express their candidacy in writing — email works — to MFB Secretary Andy Kok on or before the Annual Meeting Kickoff Nov. 3.

MFB’s State Annual Meeting Rules Committee instituted a new rule last year asking candidates for MFB director positions to provide a written statement describing how they meet the bylaw qualifications for directors, attesting that they are “directly and actively engaged in farming as owners and/or operators of farms whose primary interest is in farming” — and that they are not employed full-time in an occupation other than farming, nor serving in a county, state or national elective office.

“This move was recommended by a statewide committee several years ago,” Kok said, “to help the delegates understand how each candidate meets the ‘full-time farmer’ eligibility requirement for service on the board of directors.”

Statements will be shared with delegates prior to elections taking place.

Prospective candidates should contact Kok directly for the necessary form or more information.

Not up for reelection this year are those directors representing even-numbered districts:

  • Dist. 2 — Jennifer Lewis (Hillsdale)
  • Dist. 4 — Jeff Sandborn (Ionia)
  • Dist. 6 — Travis Fahley (St. Clair)
  • Dist. 8 — Michael Mulders (Bay)
  • Dist. 10 — Leona Daniels (Arenac)
  • Dist. 12 — David Bahrman (Hiawathaland)

Every year half of the MFB Board of Directors are up for election or re-election: even-numbered districts in even numbered years, odd-numbered districts in odd years. Two/Three at-large directors (from anywhere in the state) are also up for reelectio

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