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Top Story

Michigan Farm Bureau


The Michigan Farm Bureau team continues working on your behalf to advocate for your needs and connect you with resources to protect your farm business and employees during this challenging time.

As agriculture serves our state and nation as essential infrastructure, we recognize the need for personal protective equipment (PPE) is increasing and it will continue to as we begin to reopen the economy. PPE includes respirators, face masks, hand sanitizer, gloves, gowns, disinfectants, thermometers, face shields, barriers, wipes, goggles/glasses, etc.

To help connect you with PPE supplies for you and your employees, our team partnered with Great Lakes Ag Labor Services to compile a list of vendors willing to fulfill agriculture-based orders.

You can also access the complete MFB Coronavirus Resource web page here.

It’s important to note that inventory continues to fluctuate and is not guaranteed. Pricing of products, volume availability, order lead times, minimum order requirements, and shipping arrangements are all at the vendor’s discretion.  

Upon receiving your PPE and distributing to your farm and business employees, we encourage you to read the following Michigan Farm News story to ensure the PPE is being utilized correctly. COVID-19 PPE tutorial: When to use respirators, facemasks, or cloth face coverings in agriculture

Following are some best practices we recommend for sourcing Personal Protective Equipment:

  1. Check with your current supplier first. Most PPE is on allocation to other customers as the needs for healthcare are met. Websites may display product as unavailable or without a price, so contact suppliers by phone to speak directly with a salesperson. 
  2. Explain that you are part of the food and agriculture sector. Agriculture is an essential industry sector: ranked number two in priority behind health care/first responders. 
  3. Make your contacts as soon as possible. There will be additional requests when the state opens fully on May 15. 
  4. Consider pooling orders with neighboring farms and agribusinesses. There may be minimum order requirements depending on the supplier and a larger order may result in better pricing and delivery options. 
  5. Make sure you are using a trusted supplier. Cybercriminals and scammers are leveraging the COVID-19 pandemic for financial benefit. The latest FBI alert warns hackers are targeting industries that are attempting to buy PPE with business email compromise mail.  
  6. Take into consideration time frame and location. A supplier may not be able to meet entire order quantity immediately but will allocate supplies as they become available. Also make sure you’re talking to a supplier that will deliver near, or directly to, your location. 

If you have additional questions about PPE procurement, simply email us  and we’ll direct your inquiry to the appropriate team member.  

Thank you for your commitment to agriculture and Michigan Farm Bureau. We appreciate your membership and hope you and your family stay safe and healthy.  

To help connect you with PPE supplies for you and your employees, our team partnered with Great Lakes Ag Labor Services to compile a list of vendors willing to fulfill agriculture-based orders.

County News

By Kate Thiel


Are you an artist at heart? Back by popular demand, the Agricultural Art Gallery provides an opportunity for Farm Bureau members to showcase their artistic abilities while celebrating agriculture. Members from across the state are encouraged to enter items in six categories:

  • Woodworking
  • Metal work
  • Drawing & painting
  • Fabric & fiber
  • Photography
  • 3D art (ceramics, pottery, sculpture)

Entrants’ peers will celebrate their work during MFB’s 2020 Annual Meeting, Dec. 1-3 in Grand Rapids. Popular vote during the event will determine a best in show and category winners.

All entries are considered contributions to the Michigan Foundation for Agriculture, unless otherwise noted. As such, funds generated will support leadership and educational programming throughout the state.

Popular vote winners will be auctioned live Wednesday evening. All other entries will be available via silent auction.

Prospective entrants are asked to register their entries before Nov. 20 by using this online registration form.

Kate Thiel is the Development Manager for the Michigan Foundation for Agriculture.


The Agricultural Art Gallery provides an opportunity for Farm Bureau members to showcase their artistic abilities while celebrating agriculture.

Michigan Farm Bureau


The Michigan Farm Bureau team continues working on your behalf to advocate for your needs and connect you with resources to protect your farm business and employees during this challenging time.

As agriculture serves our state and nation as essential infrastructure, we recognize the need for personal protective equipment (PPE) is increasing and it will continue to as we begin to reopen the economy. PPE includes respirators, face masks, hand sanitizer, gloves, gowns, disinfectants, thermometers, face shields, barriers, wipes, goggles/glasses, etc.

To help connect you with PPE supplies for you and your employees, our team partnered with Great Lakes Ag Labor Services to compile a list of vendors willing to fulfill agriculture-based orders.

You can also access the complete MFB Coronavirus Resource web page here.

It’s important to note that inventory continues to fluctuate and is not guaranteed. Pricing of products, volume availability, order lead times, minimum order requirements, and shipping arrangements are all at the vendor’s discretion.  

Upon receiving your PPE and distributing to your farm and business employees, we encourage you to read the following Michigan Farm News story to ensure the PPE is being utilized correctly. COVID-19 PPE tutorial: When to use respirators, facemasks, or cloth face coverings in agriculture

Following are some best practices we recommend for sourcing Personal Protective Equipment:

  1. Check with your current supplier first. Most PPE is on allocation to other customers as the needs for healthcare are met. Websites may display product as unavailable or without a price, so contact suppliers by phone to speak directly with a salesperson. 
  2. Explain that you are part of the food and agriculture sector. Agriculture is an essential industry sector: ranked number two in priority behind health care/first responders. 
  3. Make your contacts as soon as possible. There will be additional requests when the state opens fully on May 15. 
  4. Consider pooling orders with neighboring farms and agribusinesses. There may be minimum order requirements depending on the supplier and a larger order may result in better pricing and delivery options. 
  5. Make sure you are using a trusted supplier. Cybercriminals and scammers are leveraging the COVID-19 pandemic for financial benefit. The latest FBI alert warns hackers are targeting industries that are attempting to buy PPE with business email compromise mail.  
  6. Take into consideration time frame and location. A supplier may not be able to meet entire order quantity immediately but will allocate supplies as they become available. Also make sure you’re talking to a supplier that will deliver near, or directly to, your location. 

If you have additional questions about PPE procurement, simply email us  and we’ll direct your inquiry to the appropriate team member.  

Thank you for your commitment to agriculture and Michigan Farm Bureau. We appreciate your membership and hope you and your family stay safe and healthy.  

To help connect you with PPE supplies for you and your employees, our team partnered with Great Lakes Ag Labor Services to compile a list of vendors willing to fulfill agriculture-based orders.

State News

Megan Sprague & Amelia Miller


Function over form: Online meetings can be clunky, but they get the job done keeping people on task and in the good company of friendly faces. 

COVID-19 brought a whole new set of frustrations to the farming community, with in-person gatherings put on hold across Michigan. Even so, Farm Bureau members have found ways to connect virtually, sharing information, conducting business and checking in on friends and neighbors.

Young Farmers at the county, district and state level have been using video conferencing tools to update each other on topical industry issues and more light-hearted topics like new animal additions and quarantine hobbies.

Bridget Moore, District 7 representative on the state Young Farmer committee, brought county chairs together virtually via Zoom.

“Normally it’s important and enjoyable to talk with fellow farmers and friends, but during COVID it’s made us realize our farming friends and Young Farmer programs have become even more important to us,” she said. “Sharing what is positive in our lives has kept us uplifted and trending toward a summer of hope.”

The state committee’s District 9 representative, Jeff Dreves, has met remotely with his county chairs as well.

“Meeting virtually and being able to actually see people’s faces is a really interesting way for us to stay connected through this,” he said. “This truly shows us how strong we are as an organization, going to any lengths to discuss hot-button issues and see how everyone is doing.”

Promotion and Education volunteers are also taking advantage of virtual meetings. Several districts have hosted chair gatherings online to commiserate in the cancelation of spring events, to brainstorm virtual engagement opportunities for connecting with students and teachers, and to support each other as spring farming rolls along.

Counties have created videos for teachers whose students were unable to attend an in-person Project RED this spring. Teachers used these videos as a part of their virtual teaching. Other counties have delivered snacks to healthcare workers or shared agricultural information on Facebook to connect with their community.

Participants on District 3’s P&E chair call agreed a virtual meeting was in some ways easier than meeting in person: nobody had to drive, it took almost exactly an hour, and the planning was minimal. In an unsettling time, even meeting online provides some normalcy and the comfort of seeing familiar faces.

If you’re interested in hosting a virtual Young Farmer or Promotion & Education meeting, reach out to your MFB Regional Manager or your district’s representative on the state Young Farmer or Promotion & Education committees.

Megan Sprague and Amelia Miller manage MFB’s Young Farmer and Promotion & Education programs, respectively.

Young Farmers at the county, district and state level have been using video conferencing tools to update each other on topical industry issues and more light-hearted topics like new animal additions and quarantine hobbies.

In late May, Michigan Farm Bureau, alongside a coalition of commodity organizations and more than 120 farms, took historic action to challenge the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy’s permit regulating the state’s large livestock farms by filing an administrative appeal with the Michigan Office of Administrative Hearings and Rules.

The undertaking has strong roots in your member-developed policy that – in many instances – conveys support for common sense and science-based regulation while admonishing regulations that are unfounded or overly burdensome. Your policy also carries messages that emphasize a need to balance environmental protection with economic realities. This balance is what ensures farms remain in business and that our natural resources are well cared for.

As county Farm Bureau members, you first demonstrated a grassroots response to the large livestock permit in December 2019 when the draft was published by the department. More than 800 farmers, and many commodity organizations, voiced their opposition by communicating the economic devastation the permit would have on Michigan agriculture because of its far-reaching impacts.

You responded, I believe, because you recognize that extending these regulations beyond livestock producers to the crop farmers that utilize their manure nutrients – among other ill-conceived provisions – sets a dangerous precedent for broader, future industry regulation that’s not based in science.

Michigan Farm Bureau isn’t giving up and we know you won’t either. The Michigan Milk Producers Association, Michigan Pork Producers Association, Michigan Allied Poultry Industries, Dairy Farmers of America, Select Milk Producers, Foremost Farms and more than 120 individual permit holding farmers have united in this process to challenge the provisions with the goal of striking them from the general permit.

Through Michigan Farm Bureau, the coalition hosted two media roundtables on June 3 to proactively provide an opportunity for select media to speak with issue experts, including permitted farmers, to better understand large livestock farms and the impact the permit has on the agriculture sector.

We encourage you to utilize the resources below on the issue and share them with fellow Farm Bureau members. You can also continue following Michigan Farm Bureau publications for updates, as the administrative challenge process can go on for months.

Questions related to the legal aspects of the challenge can be directed to Allison Eicher at 517-679-5315 while questions related to the technical aspects of the permit can be directed to Laura Campbell at 517-679-5332.

In late May, Michigan Farm Bureau, alongside a coalition of commodity organizations and more than 120 farms, took historic action to challenge the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy’s permit regulating the state’s large livest

Submit your Farm Bureau policy idea and be entered to win a LG TONE PRO HBS-780 Wireless Stereo Headset. 

Michigan Farm Bureau’s policy development process is time-tested and successful. It thrives on consistent and quality input from county Farm Bureau members like you.

You don’t have to join a committee, attend an event or even do extensive research to offer your input. Any member can weigh in on the more than 100 policies that guide Michigan Farm Bureau’s work to represent, protect and enhance the agriculture sector.

We’re looking to capture your ideas, whether they’re based on challenges you’ve experienced locally or statewide opportunities you see for the agriculture sector.

We're rolling out some prizes too: We'll be giving away a LG TONE PRO wireless stereo headset every two weeks through the end of July. 

All you have to do is take a few minutes and share your ideas for policy development via the electronic submission option.

To help members get discussion and ideas flowing, we’ve prepared briefs on emerging issues impacting the agriculture sector. Topics include:

Looking to learn more on how to engage in policy development? Contact your county Farm Bureau.

Submit your Farm Bureau policy idea and be entered to win a LG TONE PRO HBS-780 Wireless Stereo Headset.

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